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Here are some useful tips and tricks to maximize the battery life of your Android, iOS or Windows Phone 7 device.

Dim the Screen

More than any other component of your phone, the display consumes battery life at a devastating pace. Most phones include an auto-brightness feature that automatically adjusts the screen’s brightness to suit ambient lighting levels and system activity. This mode uses less power than constantly running your screen at full brightness would, of course, but you’ll get even better results by turning your screen’s brightness down to the lowest setting that you can tolerate and leaving it there. Even if you do nothing else suggested in this guide, following this one tip will extend the life of your battery dramatically.

Keep the Screen Timeout Short

Under your phone’s display settings menu, you should find an option labeled ‘Screen Timeout’ or something similar. This setting controls how long your phone’s screen stays lit after receiving input, such as a tap. Every second counts here, so set your timeout to the shortest available time. On most Android phones, the minimum is 15 seconds. If your screen timeout is currently set to 2 minutes, consider reducing that figure to 30 seconds or less.

Turn Off Bluetooth

Disable Bluetooth when you’re not using it, and your phone’s battery will last longer.No matter now much you love using Bluetooth in the car or with your hands-free headset, the extra radio is constantly listening for signals from the outside world. By turning off Bluetooth when you’re not using it, you can add an hour or more to your phone’s battery life.

Turn Off Wi-Fi When Not In Use

As with Bluetooth, your phone’s Wi-Fi radio is a serious battery drainer. While you almost certainly should prefer the improved speed of your home or office Wi-Fi connection to your mobile carrier’s wireless broadband for data services, there’s no point in leaving the Wi-Fi radio on when you’re out and about. Toggle it off when you go out the door, and turn it back on only when you plan to use data services within range of your Wi-Fi network. Android users can add the Wi-Fi toggle widget to their home screen to make this a one-tap process.

Go Easy on the GPS

Another big battery sucker is your phone’s GPS unit, which is a little radio that sends and receives signals to and from satellites to triangulate your phone’s location on the Earth’s surface. Various apps access your phone’s GPS to provide services ranging from finding nearby restaurants to checking you in on social networks. As a user, you can revoke these apps’ access to your phone’s GPS. When you install them, many apps will ask you for permission to use your location. When in doubt, say no. (And if a game, screensaver, or wallpaper app asks for your location, you should be suspicious about why it wants that data in the first place.)

Kill Extraneous Apps

Multitasking–the ability to run more than one app at a time–is a powerful smartphone feature. It also burns a lot of energy, because every app you run uses a share of your phone’s processor cycles. By killing apps that you aren’t actually using, you can drastically reduce your CPU’s workload and cut down on its power consumption. For Android phones–which are notorious battery hogs due to their wide-open multitasking capabilities–we like an app called Advanced Task Killer, which has an auto-kill feature that polices your apps throughout the day. In iOS, double-tap the Home button until the multitasking tray appears, hold an icon until an X appears, and tap the X to close the app.

Don’t Use Vibrate

Enough said.

Turn Off Nonessential Notifications

It seems as though almost every app in the app store now polls the Internet in search of updates, news, messages, and other information. When it finds something, the app may chime, light up your screen and display a message, make your LED blink, or do all of the above. And all of these things consume energy. Admittedly you likely don’t want to turn off notifications about new text messages or missed calls, but you don’t need every alert about every topic. Turning off superfluous notifications will help your battery last a little longer, and it will eliminate pointless distractions throughout your day.

Power Saver Mode and JuiceDefender for Android

JuiceDefender automatically adjusts your phone’s settings throughout the day to keep battery consumption in check. Newer Android phones include a Power Saver mode that helps manage the phone’s various power-sapping features for you. Power Saver mode automatically prevents your apps from updating in the background, dims your screen, reduces the screen timeout setting, disables on-screen animations, and turns off vibration. By default, this mode usually turns on when your battery level drops to 20 percent, but you can set it to kick in at 30 percent instead.



Summarized from the PCMag.com article “Top 10 Ways to Boost Your Smartphones Battery Life” by Robert Strohmeyer. Original can be found here: http://tinyurl.com/5va2z66